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Reporting Vietnam American Journalism 1959-1969 (Part One) (Library of America)

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Published by Library of America .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • History: World,
  • Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975,
  • Military - Vietnam War,
  • History,
  • American Journalism,
  • U.S. History - Vietnam Conflict (1965-1973),
  • History - Military / War,
  • Military,
  • Journalism,
  • History / Military / Vietnam War,
  • Press coverage,
  • United States,
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975,
  • 20th century

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsMilton J. Bates (Compiler), Lawrence Lichty (Compiler), Paul Miles (Compiler), Ronald H. Spector (Compiler), Marilyn Young (Compiler)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages858
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8684817M
ISBN 101883011582
ISBN 109781883011581

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This will fulfill the category of reading a book that takes place more than 5, miles from here, for the Book Riot challenge. Reporting Vietnam is one of the harder books I've read, and not just because it is more than pages. It's a compilation of stories, mostly from /5. The editors talked about [Reporting Vietnam: American Journalism], published by Library of America. Part one, , covers combat-front writing, profiles, think pieces and other kinds of. Reporting Vietnam is a comprehensive anthology about America’s involvement in Vietnam from many award-winning journalists who covered it. The book begins with the first American casualties and continues through foreign policy decisions and combat operations. It also provides a look inside the confusion at home in : Historynet Staff. Reporting Vietnam book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. For many Americans during the Vietnam era, the war on the home front see /5.

  Unflinching view of media and Vietnam 'Reporting Vietnam' by William M. Hammond. Library of America, $ Review by L.D. Meagher. March . Panelists discussed the book, [Reporting Vietnam], published by Library of America. The book is about the role of journalism in the conduct of the Vietnam War.   Buy Reporting Vietnam: American Journalism: (Library of America) by Cooper, Guy (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(7).   That isn't to detract from this book. It is simply that as great as this reporting was it isn't the whole story about what happened to move the public against the book includes a block of pictures of the reporters included in the book and some helpful maps of Vietnam/5(4).

  There was a time when all I knew of Vietnam war books was Tim O’Brien’s, The Things They Carried, a book that prompted the laconic entry in my book journal, “This book destroyed me.” One of the things I loved so much—and that broke my heart so cleanly—about The Things They Carried was that it reminded me of another beloved war book, Slaughterhouse-Five, in that both books are Author: Tracy Shapley. Save $25 when you purchase both volumes of Reporting Vietnam.. Reporting Vietnam Part Two: American Journalism –, along with its companion volume, captures the bravery, fear, cruelty, suffering, anger, and sorrow of a tragic second volume traces events from the revelation of the My Lai massacre in through the fall of Saigon in   In the last few years, with the publication of such books as Jacques Leslie's The Mark and William Prochnau's Once Upon a Distant War, historians and former correspondents have been examining closely the role of journalism in the conduct of the Vietnam two volumes of Reporting Vietnam offer a trove of material for such studies. Part One contains combat-front writing by . Reporting Vietnam is an abridgment and updating of Hammond's massive two-volume work issued by the Government Printing Office. Based on classified and recently declassified government documents—including Nixon's national security files—as well as on extensive interviews and surveys of press war coverage, it tells how government and media first shared a common vision of American .